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FPB 64-6 Grey Wolf: Engine Room Art

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 100

At the risk of being repetitive, we thought you might like another look at the highest form of engine room art, this time FPB 64-6 Grey Wolf. The visual presentation of these engine rooms is better than we have ever seen before, anywhere, from any builder.

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 101

We don’t have time to caption each one, so we’ll let you wander and wonder at your leisure. Enjoy.

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 103

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 106

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 107

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 108

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 109

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 111

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 110

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 114

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 113

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 112

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 124

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 122

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 121

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 120

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 119

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 130

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 129

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 127

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 126

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 125


Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 15, 2013)




14 Responses to “FPB 64-6 Grey Wolf: Engine Room Art”

  1. Alf Simpson Says:
    Sirs, As an engineer I find these posts to be very interesting and the workmanship is truly remarkable. Regards Alf

    [Reply]


  2. Kevin Costello Says:
    Amazing… There are allot of long hours involved in there! What is the coating on the walls? Is it a spray on ceramic insulation like Lizard Skin… http://www.lizardskin.com/

    [Reply]

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    The engine room surfaces and indeed the rest of the topsides and deck are coated in an Armaflex product.

    [Reply]


  3. Rod Manser Says:
    Workmanship is great I should say also as an engineer. Better than many airplane makes, and from a certification standpoint, this is serious above and beyond the call of duty. Obviously they love their work at Circa.

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  4. Raj Narayan Says:
    Functional Art Brilliantly designed, meticulously planned, flawlessly executed. I have never seen a mechanical space better done anywhere. –raj

    [Reply]


  5. David Guest Says:
    Curiously, what are the two padlocks for?

    [Reply]

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    Foredeck hatch locks.

    [Reply]


  6. Scott Says:
    WOW! a hell of a lot better than the engine room I’m currently working with! I’ll show my lot what a fuel filter system SHOULD look like! and an excellent effort to photogragh it!

    [Reply]


  7. David M. Says:
    Never noticed the ladder and hatch above the work bench before has it always been there? Nice to have natural light in the engine room.

    [Reply]

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    Yes, ladder always there for egress from the engine room.

    [Reply]


  8. Jim M Says:
    Noticed a shield over the drive shaft drip less stuffing box. I’m I correct?

    [Reply]

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    Yes. Like all PYI “dripless” shaft seals, they spray a little.

    [Reply]


  9. rene Says:
    In a number of engine room photos I noticed a V-drive and it looks like connected to the main engine? Remember they have a transmission loss of about 10-15%?? Am just surprised to see one in a boat with this length?

    [Reply]

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    The V-drive is a ZF 280-V, and we have been told the efficiency loss is about four percent, compared to 2.5% or thereabouts for a straight. Whatever the losses, the FPB 64s report a fuel burn of around 5.0 to 5.5 US gallons/hour at 9.75 to 10.0 knots. Regarding their use, we prefer straight drives, but sometimes there are length restrictions which make the use of a v-drive neccessary.

    [Reply]



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