Archive for 2005

First Crossing

At the request of a SetSail reader, Linda recalls their first ocean passage aboard Intermezzo in 1977.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 20, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Raytheon R40X Radar for World Cruising

I currently have a Raytheon R40X unit but it is an old unit (while very good) that is "dumb" and cannot talk to anything else. I can’t decide whether to replace it outright or add a 20 mile Foruno on a pole at the stern. I intend to world cruise the boat beginning in 18 months. Any thoughts? The boat is Gulfstar 50 Sailmaster that I have been updating for the voyage, and while she is older, she is a very beautiful heavy cruiser. Thanks again, Jim

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 23, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Combining GPS with Older Instruments

I have B&G autopilot circa 2000 at the pedestal (in the network series…i.e. network PILOT), network DATA at the nav table, wind, and a repeater at the bulkhead. I also have network WIND. I have an old Raytheon (as was) chartplotter(not working), and there is an old Raytheon plotter/radar (RL9) mounted on the pedestal reading from a Raytheon antenna mounted on a pole. It gives a reasonable radar signal.

My yacht is a classic 1970 Swan 40 Sp&S. design. She is now in Antigua.

My B&G instruments work perfectly. They are all Network B&G instruments I have an older Raytheon GPS antenna also mounted on the pole. I do not know if it gives NMEA(0183) output. My nav station is run by my laptop running Maxsea software and connected to a Globalstar satphone.

I propose to buy a small fixed GPS reader to be mounted at the nav station to give position…I assume it might be able to read the signal from the existing GPS antenna though if not I can replace it with a suitable antenna, and give a NMEA signal to my laptop computer. Ideally I should like this to be a B&G GPS (if there is one in the network series). Please advise if you know of one.

Should I buy Networknav? Any info comments? Where can I buy…any second-hand from upgrades? I need a good GPS receiver as I understand it.

I want to keep the B&G instruments I have. I want to make a system from what|I have that will speak thru NMEA to my laptop. Will Maxsea read any NMEA signal and overlay it on any of the charts loaded electronically. What output signals will MaxSea give to autopilot? Do you have any observations/advice?

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 8, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii towards Southern California – Day 9 – Almost There

HI-Mainland Day 9

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 18, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii towards the Mainland – Day 8

HI-Mainland Day 8

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 17, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii towards the Mainland – Day 7

HI-Mainland Day 7

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 16, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii towards the Mainland – Day 6

HI-Mainland Day 6

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 15, 2005)    |    Comments (3)

Hawaii towards the Mainland – Day 5

HI-Mainland Day 5

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 14, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii towards the Mainland – Day 4

HI-Mainland Day 4

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 13, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii towards the Mainland – Day 3

HI-Mainland Day 3

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 12, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii towards the Mainland – Day 2

HI-Mainland Day 2

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 11, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii to the Mainland – Day 1

Hawaii – Mainland Day 1

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 10, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Honolulu: Hanging Out at Hawaii Yacht Club

Honolulu Report

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 6, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Hawaii Back to the Mainland – Weather Logic

Hawaii-Mainland Wx Logic

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 5, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Samoa to Hawaii: Successful Upwind Passage

Hawaii Arrival

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 3, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Fanning towards Hawaii: Day 3

Fanning-HI-Day 3

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 2, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Fanning towards Hawaii: Day 2

Fanning-HI-Day 2

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 1, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Fanning Towards Hawaii: Day 1

Fanning-Hawaii-Day

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 30, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Fanning towards Hawaii: Departure Logic

Fanning-Hawaii Wx Logic

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 29, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Tour of Fanning

Tour of Fanning

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 28, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Pago Pago towards Fanning: Day 6

Day 6-Arrival

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 26, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Pago Pago towards Fanning: Day 5

To Fanning-Day 5

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 25, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Pago Pago towards Fanning: Day 4

To Fanning-Day 4

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 24, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Pago Pago towards Fanning: Day 3

To Fanning-Day 3

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 23, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Pago Pago towards Fanning: Day 2

Towards Fanning-Day 2

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 22, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Pago Pago towards Fanning: Day 1

Pago towards Fanning-Day 1

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 21, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Local Knowledge

We asked the SetSailors to write about their sources for local knowledge.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 6, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Preparing Food for Long Passage

It is no secret that we enjoy good food. And we see no reason why we should change our eating habits on a long passage. If anything, food preparation and consumption is one of the things we look forward to at sea, and something which helps to pass the time in an enjoyable fashion.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (August 15, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Preparation for Long Passage

Heading Home-Passage Prep

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (August 10, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

South Pacific to West Coast US: Weather Considerations

Heading Home-Wx Logic

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (August 5, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Musket Cove, Fiji

R&R in Musket Cove

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 28, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Impressions of Wind Horse’s First Passage

First Passage Impressions

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 26, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

New Zealand to Fiji: Anchored in Front of Royal Suva Yacht Club

Arrival in Fiji

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 23, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

New Zealand to Fiji: 182 Miles to Go

NZ to Fiji-1900

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 22, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

New Zealand to Fiji: 475 Miles to Go

NZ to Fiji-1700

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 21, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

New Zealand to Fiji Passage: 790 Miles to Go

NZ to Fiji-1700

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 20, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Wind Horse’s First Passage: New Zealand to Fiji

NZ to Fiji-0100

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 20, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Provisioning Past and Present, and Wind Horse Chili Recipe

The other day I was talking to my longtime friend and cruising buddy, Cheryl Schmidt, about provisioning. She and her husband Jim are preparing their 73-foot ketch Wakaroa (an early Deerfoot design) for their annual four- or five-month cruise. A typical passage for them would be a five-day trip from Auckland to Fiji. We are sea trialing our new non-sailboat, Wind Horse, in New Zealand and will be leaving for Fiji ourselves in about a month’s time.

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Jim and Cheryl Schmidt, with our daughters Elyse and Sarah, in New Zealand in 1977.

Cheryl always pre-cooks enough meals for five or six days at sea. She freezes them in individual-size containers that she can take from the freezer to the microwave. The Schmidts like to spend a lot of time in the cockpit, and it’s easy for her to pop down below and heat up dinner – they can even eat out of the containers. A variety of plastic containers are available in supermarkets – you don’t need the expensive kind – the throw-away type works just fine for this, as long as it can go from the freezer to the microwave. She usually prepares comfort foods: soups, chili, lasagna and homemade chicken nuggets. She bakes cookies (as do I) and carries the pre-washed cut salads that are now available. For eating salads during the passage, she carries stainless steel bowls. This trip can be boisterous.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 16, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Staying in Touch and Paying the Bills while Cruising

Staying in touch and paying the bills while cruising.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 22, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Indian Ocean Tsunamis – Lessons Learned

As awful as the devastation and loss of life has been from the Indian Ocean tsunamis, there are still some lessons that can be learned. The following comments are based on discussions with those on hand, plus previous experiences in California and Hawaii.

Warning Signs

The normal nature of tsunamis is such that they are preceded by a long-range trough. This causes an atypical drop in water level. This occurred during the recent Indian Ocean situation, and was responsible for much of the loss of life at Hilo, Hawaii, many years ago when it was hit (many of those drowned at Hilo were out on the reefs looking for shells in the unusually low tide).
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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 21, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Ground Tackle

Ground tackle is probably the single most important system on the boat in terms of safety, comfort, and peace of mind. Our approach is based on a steep learning curve-which we survived-but which we would not want to repeat. The bottom line is this: we assume that we’re stuck in an anchorage where we cannot leave, the winds have put us on a lee shore, and bottom holding is poor. Our ground tackle systems are engineered to give us the best chances of a happy outcome in this type of scenario. The side benefit is that we are totally secure in anything less than awful conditions, and we can anchor on much shorter scope the 99% of the time conditions are favorable.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 10, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Email Transmission Rates

For some time we’ve been confused by e-mail data rates and cost, as it applies to boat-based communications. Recently, Mike Parker, a new Sundeer owner and old-time glider guru, brought us up to speed on this subject. Here’s what we learned.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (February 13, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Preparing Crew for Offshore Passage

The Dashews answer our questions on how they would prepare crew for an offshore passage.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 19, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Tsunami Photos Sent by Cruisers

The following photos were taken by Catherine York, who was aboard the J46 Aragorn anchored off Phi Phi Don, Thailand, when the tsunamis hit.  These photos cover a one-minute span, showing the first ebb and the first flood.

Image

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Posted by Sarah.Dashew  (January 18, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

2004 Tsunamis: After the Deluge

John Gray runs sea kayak tours based out of Phuket, Thailand. He sent us this article about his experiences with the tsunamis, and his attempts to warn others about the risk thereof.

The tremors began at 7.58am. The long, low-frequency shakes lasted two minutes. It wasn’t the shattering, sharp jolt one expects from a California quake, but it felt ominous. The tremors lasted long enough that I had time to put a bowl of water on the floor to verify the shakes. Sure enough, the water was rippling.

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Posted by Sarah.Dashew  (January 10, 2005)    |    Comments (0)

Tsunami at Anchor

Here’s a report from Gavin and Sukey of Scott-Free, circumnavigators who were in Thailand during the tsunamis. Interesting feedback on the three waves and how they behaved in 12m (40 feet) of water.

Hello “out there”. First and foremost, thanks to those of you who have rung or e-mailed over the last few days concerned about our welfare. The situation along the coast here in Thailand, particularly Phuket, is fairly disastrous, as most of you will know, since I understand the coverage has been understandably extensive with some dramatic and horrible images of the mayhem caused by the Tsunamis.

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Posted by Sarah.Dashew  (January 10, 2005)    |    Comments (0)