Design Objectives

The Right Recipe: Where Do You Find It?

fii3844©Stan & Valerie Creighton: Fulaga, Fiji

When your voyaging takes you off the beaten path, where shore power and technical assistance is a rarity, the ingredients required for successful cruising change.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 1, 2016)    |    Comments (2)

Evaluating Stability and Capsize Risks For Yachts

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Over the last couple of years we have had a number of discussions about the mechanics of stability and capsize risks. Read the rest »


Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 8, 2012)    |    Comments (34)

Heavy Weather Issues

If you’re thinking about heading offshore at some point, the comments which follow may be of interest.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 5, 2012)    |    Comments (9)

Safety and Stability vs. Capsize–Thoughts on Yogi

With the recent capsize and sinking of the mega yacht Yogi in the Aegean Sea off Greece in moderate gale conditions, there has been a lot of chatter about the causes, and several SetSailors have asked us our thoughts. Read the rest »


Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 1, 2012)    |    Comments (11)

Directional Control

“Wind Horse is well behaved. She tracks straight. The autopilot gain is set to its lowest level and we find our own way down the waves, showing us occasional bursts to 20 knots.”
–Yachting World Magazine

Most cruisers dream about trade wind passages: long periods with the wind and seas on the quarter, steady winds, and beautiful puffy clouds. But in the context of being comfortable at sea, trade wind sailing is often less desirable than other angles.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 20, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

Stability, Comfort & Capsize Resistance

The ultimate safety test for any vessel bound offshore is how well it resists capsize. Many factors enter into this equation.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 19, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

Designing for Comfort at Sea

“Even the fine details on board make Wind Horse a pinnacle of cruising dedication, like…the 4 in fiddles on every flat surface in the saloon and galley, and the fact that no matter where you are, a handhold or two will be close by.”
–Motor Boat & Yachting

What we’ve found over the years is that even though a small percentage of our time is actually spent at sea, if this time is not comfortable, then the boats tend to sit rather than move on to new locations.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 15, 2011)    |    Comments (3)

Glazing

“The panes of glass in the steering house are 18 mm thick…”
–Motor Boat & Yachting

It’s not easy to make the structure strong enough for a rollover, or being dropped off a wave – but it’s a cinch compared with getting the window system to stand up to these loads.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 15, 2011)    |    Comments (4)

Maintaining an Aluminum Hull

“Steve and Linda, prefer natural aluminum because it doesn’t demand the incessant maintenance of a painted boat. In fact, the aluminum oxide that eventually coats the exterior is tougher than any paint.”
–Yachting Magazine

We’ve built about half our clients’ (custom) boats in aluminum, and half in fiberglass. During the material selection process, we’re always asked about the maintenance of both.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 15, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

Painted or Bare Aluminum?

” Wind Horse is deliberately left unpainted and will take on a dull patina as it self-anodizes. This actually suits Skip and Linda. Apart from removing the need for maintenance, the boat has a low-key ‘workboat’, almost military look about her.”
–Sea Spray Magazine

We have been working through the paint or bare question with clients for twenty-plus years. There are many practical reasons for leaving the topside aluminum bare, but you also need to enjoy looking at the boat.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 15, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

Hull & Deck Structure

The key to this design goal was the ability to deal with heavy weather with a margin for operator error.”
–Bluewater Sailing Magazine

Engineering a boat is a mix of science, numbers, black art, and experience. You have to first establish a set of guidelines to use.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 14, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

Pitching in Headseas

“Our photo boat – a Windy 42 Bora (and a very good sea boat) – is tossed around like a bath toy, but Wind horse just brushes through the crests with laughable ease.”
–Motor Boat & Yachting

Of all the comfort issues facing a passagemaking vessel – power or sail – how it deals with headseas has the biggest impact on crew comfort.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 14, 2011)    |    Comments (3)

Design Objectives

NewImage

The most important part of the design process is defining just what it is we are trying to achieve.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 14, 2011)    |    Comments (0)