Cruisers Q & A

We get e-mailed questions daily on a variety of marine-related subjects. Check out these Frequently Asked Questions for some very interesting dialogue.

If you’d like to submit a question, just click the Email hotlink, and put Cruiser’s Q & A in the subject line. Steve and Linda will answer as soon as time permits. (Please be patient! They don’t have time to answer every question, and if they’re out cruising the answers might have to wait a while.)

You’ll also find an orange “comment” button at the bottom of each article. Feel free to use this if you have a followup question, or some information to contribute to an article.

To browse through our Cruisers Q & A’s, just scroll down and enjoy the posts.

Cruising Boat Choices

Dear Steve:

Thanks so much for your various books. I just finished devouring Practical Seamanship. I have gained greatly from reading and practicing the insights shared, particularly sail balancing and heavy weather techniques. When read in conjunction with the video’s, the books are even more informative.

I presently have a 461 Beneteau. I like it very much. My wife thinks it is a bit too sporty & light. We use it for coastal crusing (West coast). We are in the beginning process of evaluating boats which are better designed/ suited for passage making. Like most everyone, we would like to sail BEOWULF, or its equivilent, but it is not likely to ever be in reach of our budget. I personally would like a Sundeer 64, but it is uncertain whether one would become available, or be affordable. As with so many others who have written before me, I am seeking advice to help with my quest.

We are looking to spend $400-500,000. I had been thinking of the Amel Super Maramu 53, but after comparing its hull design to that of the Sundeers/Deerfoots, it appears more suited to light conditions. Others we have considered seemed a bit too beamy and/or had keel/rudder designs which were not conducive to surfing. Any thoughts on production/semi-custom boats that we should focus on? My inclination would be toward a ketch, but I’d be happy with a cutter rig.

Thanks again for sharing so much and considering my questions. Linda has been quite an inspiration for my wife, who really only likes warm days with the wind behind the beam.–Mark

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 10, 2003)    |    Comments (0)

Email While World Cruising

I am seeking advice re the best choice for setting up an email account for use during my family’s upcoming sail around the world. My crew are my wife and two young daughters (5 and 8). We plan to depart in September 2003 from Groton CT aboard our Westsail 32. First of all, we plan to have a ham radio Winlink email address (if I can just carve out enough time to study for and take the tests!). But for sending and receiving photos and large attachments I gather that we should consider having an email address that we can access from Internet cafes and similar locations using our laptop. Do we need to have a subscription internet service provider that we would dial into from landlines at foreign ports? If so which is best? A free one like Hotmail (I think it’s free)? Or do we need to pay $10 to $20+ per month for an ISP like Earthlink or AOL? Do we simply need the email address and then plan to use the Internet cafe’s or other retail location’s internet service provider to gain access to the web. As you can tell, I am having trouble figuring all this out and would really appreciate your guidance as to whom we should contact for the best, most current advice. Thank you for whatever you can tell me to get us headed in the right direction.– Doug

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 28, 2003)    |    Comments (0)

Chart and Radar Integration

Hi Steve, I don’t know if you covered this anywhere (couldn’t find it in your books, SetSail or in MaxSea) but I have to renew/upgrade my Radar. Obviously want to get one with Mini ARPA output for overlaying targets on MaxSea/charts. However, in addition, sailing mainly shorthanded, would like (need) to have chart, radar and overlays (if possible) on a repeater in the cockpit.

All the main Radar/Chart Plotter suppliers (Raymarine, Furuno etc.) don’t have any protocol for third party suppliers of chart software to repeat via their screens either main or repeater. As far as I found out so far, only RayTech Navigator (with additional Racing module upgrade) allows their propriety software to connect via their "Seatalk" or HSB and one (or more) of their Radar/Plotter displays.

In other words, it seems to me only Raymarine, if you buy their chart software cables, HSB or Seatalk etc. is able to achieve this desirable requirement. That would mean dumping MaxSea (of which I have an investment already) and going all RayMarine? (coincidentally I have all RayMarine ST 60’s instrumentation in the cockpit). All the other systems are capable of Radar/Plotter as main screen with repeaters (Furuno’s NavNet for example) in cockpit, but then you have to buy their cartridge Rom’s with the charts again and that would cost a fortune.

Any suggestions on how to "get repeated" in the cockpit without costing a fortune in waterproof tablet computers? Also, are there any Radars on the market which give a signal to operate on a PC/Laptop which could then be duplicated somehow to a screen in the cockpit (along with the chart plotting of course)? (what about using a PDA as a dumb terminal via wireless? bit small I know, but thinking of cost).

Appreciate your views/advice/knowledge on this subject. Kind regards/George W

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 22, 2002)    |    Comments (0)

SSB vs. Iridium/Globalstar

Question regarding SSB vs. Iridium/Globalstar…..I read the nice item on Setsail.com on Iridium/Globalstar and agree that it is coming into vogue economically for data communications/e-mail, etc….It is definitely easier for everyone on board to use in a crunch. But don’t you lose the flexibility to participate in net calls, etc.? It seems that there are always tradeoffs…You can access SailMail via the Sat. phones, correct? Also, I’m upgrading my sailing info instruments (wind direction,speed,etc.). What are your thoughts on a good manufacturer of these items in reference to MaxSea interface? Thanks, Ed

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (May 20, 2002)    |    Comments (0)

Medical Insurance for Cruising

In the Bernhardts’ April 01, 2001 discussion of their cruising budget, they state that they pay $2280 for medical insurance for the year for the whole family. I’d like to know which insurance company they use. Their boat insurance is fairly inexpensive also, since their cruising area includes Europe…Love this site. Thanks. Claire D

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 2001)    |    Comments (0)

World Storm Patterns

Hi, I am enjoying reading our book “Surviving the Storm”. I know you could not cover all the topics, and I have not read the whole book yet, but I could not find data or reference to world storm patterns. If one was chicken, and wanted to avoid category two and three heavy weather storms (page 16), what cruising routes could be planned, and where not to be at what time of year? I recall some published charts that show wind direction and speed at various locations. What about information on routes and the best time of the year to avoid bad storms. Could you name a few good sources for me. I get the hint that New Zealand is risky at best. If I missed this information in your book, please let me know where it is located. Thanks, Mike

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 4, 2001)    |    Comments (0)

Prioritizing Electronics for Cruising on 42′ Cat

I found your web site today and was fascinated with all the possibilities. We are in the process of buying a 42′ cat and will be sailing from the US East Coast through the Panama Canal and out to the South Pacific and points beyond. The boat does not have anything other than self steering and basic instruments and we would like to equip with radar, gps, plotter, etc…running into a PC and of course not spend a fortune. What would you suggest as someone who obviously has a great deal of experience? The route plotting seems like a great idea and we will have a sat phone but are unsure about a SSB. Thanks, David

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 16, 2001)    |    Comments (0)

Seagoing Web Access

Linda & Steve, In your recent article on the new passage planning software (I hope to see more on this later) you made a comment regarding downloading weather forecast data during your passage. What method do you use to access internet at sea?? Regards, Mark

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 3, 2001)    |    Comments (0)

Iridium Back in Business?

Steve: A new Iridium Satellite LLC has just announced on CNBC that these satellites are back in business with coverage over 100% of the globe. Great for offshore roaming types. Phone cost looks like $1500US for the handset, which accepts on-line data. I don’t have info about operating costs. Regards, DM

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 28, 2001)    |    Comments (0)

Log Pages

Could you…let me know what info should be included in a ship log, or send over an example? Lisa P.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 21, 2001)    |    Comments (0)

Globalstar

I’m fascinated by your comments about Globalstar–do you think it’s a viable option for our cruise despite the company’s problems? I’m reluctant to buy a $1000 SSB modem if we can get satellite service instead…Best regards, Candace

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 30, 2001)    |    Comments (0)

Unusual Revolving Storms

Firstly, let me say how much I am enjoying your books, Mariner’s Weather Handbook and Surviving the Storm. For anyone with the slightest interest in the weather around them and in taking a boat to sea, they are excellent reading. However, I do have a couple of queries:

On page 340 of the ‘Mariner’s Weather Handbook’ you show three photographs of tropical revolving storms, when and where they should not be, one off Angola (West Africa) in April 1991 and two of one storm in the Eastern Mediterranean in January (no year mentioned). It is my understanding that no tropical revolving storms have ever been reported in the South Atlantic (until now) and that the sea temperatures in the Eastern Mediterranean in January are certainly not high enough for cyclogenesis nor is the ITCZ anywhere near the Mediterranean. Have you any explanation for these phenomena and/or a year for the Mediterranean storm (I would like to research past meteorological records to find what conditions actually existed in the latter case).

I look forward to your reply, Brent

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 3, 2000)    |    Comments (0)

Max Prop w/ Shaft Generator

In your very valuable Encyclopedia (looking forward to read the heavy weather issue) you briefly mentioned a way to generate DC power with a MAXPROP or AUTOPROP. Is there any description available on this setup? My boat is a Gerard Dijkstra designed 77 ft centerboard shooner (steel, 60 tons) and a MAXPROP is fitted but I am thinking of changing to AUTOPROP (only for performance when maneuvering). Is it possible to do the same trick with this prop? I hope you find the time for an answer. Best regards, Paul

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Tips for Electric Windlass

Dear Steve and Linda, Impressed by your books, esp. the encyclopedia. Still I’ve 1 question: I’m looking for a powered windlass for my new 50′ ALU ketch. In your books you hint electrical windlasses are good enough, however I hear from different people that they can only work for a short period because of heating of the DC motor. Indeed e.g. Muir says to me: max. 10 minutes running time. At a speed of 8 m.min that’s only 80 meters chain. Now you also write that anchoring involves 3 maybe even 5 trials before the anchor holds. How does that relate to each other? Wouldn’t therefore a hydraulic windlass be better? Many thanks in advance, Ronald

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Centerboards

Dear Steve and Linda, heaving read all of your books I would like to thank you for your advice given there. As only one example, we’ve changed our mainsail to an extra-roached, fully-battened one which gave us 1 knot extra speed at all courses, which is a lot for 34 feet. Having a double backstay we don’t see any problems even with 30 cms overlap.

My question now is: What do you think of centerboards? We are interested in a 43′ Dutch aluminium Koopmans design which has no keel whatsoever. She sports only internal ballast and the centerboard seems rather small (weighing around 400 kg). The boat was constructed for falling dry in the North Sea. She has a long waterline and a draft of 1,20 meters board up and 2,50 m board down. The rudder is fully integrated into the hull and in line with the ship’s bottom, more just like a motorboat. Is the rudder surface of approx. 1,2 squaremeters large enough and the profile (not balanced) effective to steer the ship in a heavy going?

Thanks for some advice, and have some fun with your grandbaby. Andreas

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Non Skid on Aluminum Decks

Hello Steve, We have an Aluminum boat and we’re in the midst of denuding the deck of fairing compound. With no anti-skid, what do you think are the best deck shoes to use to minimize the chance of careening overboard in heavy weather.

Thanks for the help. Edward

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Ergonomics On Board

Greetings. Does your library of encyclopedic knowledge have any definitive source(s) for optimum, spatial ergonomics for the interiors of vessels? For instance, passageways 18″ – 22″ wide? Head & shower stall sizes…what’s adequate (for basic duties and toweling off) yet still economic in size? In a “U” shaped galley is 36″ between counters OK? Seating around a dinette…how much room should be allowed for each “sitter” and comfortable “elbow room”? I trust you get my drift as the list of examples could go on forever. I’ve seen your comments on headroom but very little on provisions for comfort, ease and safety whilst moving about and living on a vessel in a seaway. Hopefully you’ve covered this subject before, but if not, it might make a good topic for consideration.

I should add that I fully appreciate the functioning of a proper boat…not a floating condominium or “gin palace”!…And know the danger factor of being thrown about in overly generous living and/or poorly designed interior spaces. Further, I acknowledge that this topic is subject to personal preferences but believe there is, or should be a baseline to start with. Thank you for any information you can provide. Cheers, Richard

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Advice for a Landlubber Who Wants to Go Cruising

Hello Steve,

This question may sound like I’m biting off more than I can chew, however my wife and I are fully committed to doing it anyway. The house is on the market and we’ve promised ourselves that we’ll give it at least one year before we make our minds up whether to keep sailing or return to landlubbers.

I am 41 year old, have almost no sailing experience other than going out on our local bay (Morton bay–Brisbane Australia) with friends on their mid 20ft day-sailers. This is where we (my wife and I ) intend to live aboard and learn to sail until I feel confident enough to coastal sail the 400 miles up to the Whitsunday Island group, and then offshore to the South Pacific Islands and beyond when we’re ready!

Just so you understand my reasoning in learning to sail this way, as opposed to getting a small kneel boat first, I wish to live aboard now, I have always found it easier and quicker for ME to learn by jumping in with both feet. I don’t learn easily in a structured environment, ie: sailing school, I enjoy a challenge. I quite often have people say to me after they get to know me "is there anything that you can’t do!" Some examples–I’ve built my own house from start to finish using no other trades except electrician, it is being sold as I write this for over half a million dollars (this is our cruising kitty) or rebuilding the Isuzu turbo diesel in my 4×4 campervan in remote central Australia when it split the skirting on a piston, I’d never worked on a diesel before.

I have just retired from 17 years as a professional motorcycle racer. This has taught me to trust my own judgment, recognise the difference between fear and danger, anticipate consequences and problems before they happen and never to let anxiety or fear cloud your judgment. As strange as it seems I think these qualities should be a good base from which to jump into the world of cruising. Oh and I grew up on a remote outback cattle station, so being isolated and self reliant is second nature to me.

Ok, now you’re probably thinking this guys got a couple of kangaroo’s loose in the top paddock.

Here’s what I am thinking:
Spending a total of about $150,000 AUS (this will leave us with 2 rental houses debt free for income )
A steel, aluminum or cold moulded wood boat (no doubt I’ll run aground while I’m learning) with a good size engine to pull us off a lee shore while learning too.
34-38 ft ( although my 24 year old cousin who has been the youngest captain ever to do the Sydney to Hobart races including the 1998 storm when he was just 19, says get a 40+ ft boat as it won’t be any harder to learn to sail than the smaller boat and be much better to live aboard)

After reading your sensational OFFSHORE CRUISING ENCYCLOPEDIA, on page 1123 HIO AVAE a Santana 37, I would be very interested on what you would think of this for our first boat?

I guess my biggest question is, should I buy a smaller coastal cruiser and then in a couple of years buy a bigger offshore blue water boat or put up with the inconveniences of a bigger blue water boat while we learn coastal cruising ( I am assuming that it would take at least a year to learn to sail any new boat to its full potential, so selling a coastal cruiser in couple of years then learning a new bigger blue water boat may be counter productive?

Should it be a more traditional design with heavy displacement, full keel etc. which will cope more easily with my mistakes while I’m learning or a boat with a fin keel canoe shaped hull that you favour?

I will probably have my cousin help in choosing from a short list of half-dozen boats the final boat, as he will have a better understanding of a good layout for systems on deck and living under deck.

Regards Peter

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

“Less Is More” Approach to Cruising

Hi: I would like to know what you consider the minimum a couple would need to set up a cruising boat in the 35′ range-we are looking for a Ferro-cement at present. I also believe in the ‘less is more’ approach. Thank you and good cruising

John K.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Solar Panels

Hi. We’re about to install rigid (as opposed to flexible) solar panels on our Cal 3-46: looking at a number of options for placement: atop dodger, atop Kato davits at stern, swiveled at side rails–any comments about optimum placement and subsequent sailing/safety issues? Thanks, Glenys

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Watermakers

We are in the process of purchasing an LRC trawler and are wondering about the advisability of including a watermaking system. We don’t know which is preferable, reverse osmosis or evaporator. Any thoughts on types, preferred brands, tradeoffs, etc? Any help would be hugely appreciated. Thanks, Tom C. and Bob S.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Predicting Weather

Hi. I have purchased and completely read Mariner’s Weather Handbook, and now I am reading Surviving the Storm. I would like to take a stab at weather prediction, say for my own area (Detroit, MI) as a way to build the skills you suggest are necessary to make the best possible passages. My problem is, after reading all this material I must be in info overload as I have no idea how to start. Could you suggest a simple recipe for doing prediction using the internet that I could try out? I tried looking at some of the marine sites mentioned in the book, but there are so many sites and so many links to info. I am lost. A recipe might look like…

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Which Faxes to Study

I’m starting to practice weather forecasting with the 500mb and surface charts. The NWS site has lots of different charts with different forecasts such as 12,24 or 36hr forecasts. Which one of these would you recommend that I use to practice?

These are the charts I download: 15.00Z Surface Analysis Chart Part 1 10E-45W Northern Hemisphere Size: 38.4K–Updated: Fri Nov 26 03:23:37 1999 UTC 16.00Z Surface Analysis Chart Part 2 40W-95W Northern Hemisphere Size: 32.5K–Updated: Fri Nov 26 03:33:36 1999 UTC 28.00Z 500MB Surface Chart Analysis 45W-85W Northern Hemisphere Size: 26.8K–Updated: Thu Nov 25 23:23:35 1999 UTC.

I’m “superimposing” the 500mb on the surface analysis charts to forecast what the weather will be like for the next 24 hrs. Am I on the right track?? Regards, Susan

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Gulfstar Sailmaster 47

We are considering buying a Gulfstar 47 Sailmaster and are interested in your comments concerning the Sailmaster 50. I.E. that it was never intended for world cruising and its lack of performance. Friends that own these 47’s claim the boat sails great (at least the sloop rig) and it does quite well in heavy weather. Any comments regarding sloop versus ketch rigs? Please be specific about why you feel this way as I’m very interested in this boat – as you said, there is massive space and livability.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (3)

Survey for Used Cal 40

Hi Dashews–After many months of research and viewing, we have found our first boat! We are buying a 1964 Cal 40 in mostly lovely condition for about 50K. I would like your opinion on a couple of concerns I had about the boat.

1. We had an engine survey done and the V-drive needs replacing–what other mechanical systems would V-drive failure affect? Stuffing box? Prop? etc?

2. I have been trying to find out specifics on the hull construction (I was told it was made of 5 hand-laid layers of fiberglass & would be thrilled to find out if that’s true!) but am not having much luck. Are there any non-destructive tests that can be done on hulls to check the condition & thickness of the fiberglass?

3. I have done enough research to know that the tabbing on the Cal 40s is weak and that there are some concerns with the deck-hull joint. Will a surveyor specifically check the bulkheads and the d-h joint for signs of weakness as a matter of course or do I need to instruct him as to what exactly I want inspected?

4. There is some minor decay on the bridge beam–what’s the best way to stop it? Any info at all would be appreciated–we set sail for the first time ever in June!! Thanks, Erin

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Slab Reefing

Hi, I’ve just purchased a 1975 Westerly Centaur (and yes, I don’t plan on getting anywhere quickly). The boat has its original rigging including a roller-reefing boom. I would like to employ some sort of basic slab reefing type approach, but there are no reef hooks and there doesn’t appear to be an blocks on the stern end of the boom for running lines to the clew of each reef. Can I just mount all of this on the present boom and run appropriate lines? If I can mount such hardware, would I rivet it onto the boom? Or do I need to think about a new boom (I really don’t want to buy a new boom). Thanks! – Arthur

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Single-Line Reefing

Dear Steve: I read your comment regarding your new single-line reefing system and your intention to write about it ( 6Sept 2000 article). Have you done that somewhere? I’m in New Zealand rethinking my reefing system and sail controls in general and I’d be interested in your thoughts. One of the riggers here is telling me that he has good luck on big boats with single-line reefing, so I’m tempted to try it. My boat is only 52 feet, so he thinks it would be no problem. Randy

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Sources for UHMW Plastic

Dear Linda & Steve, Thanks for your really interesting Weather Handbook, which we began reading. It will certainly take some time…Together with our local sailmaker we are constructing an extra-roached mainsail, which will be ready in spring (this is not California). However, he did not know where to get UHMW fabric to protect this sail from chafe. Can you give us some help, maybe another name for that or a company which sells this stuff in the old world? Many thanks in advance.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Rudder Stock on an Aluminum Boat

I am building an Aluminum Sailboat with a spade rudder and rudder stock. I am planning to use UHMWPE plain bearings. Would it be a good idea to hard anodise the shaft in the area of the bearings to reduce the wear? Would there be any corrosion issues? Thanks, Howard

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Calculating Cruising Speed

Hi Steve. With a 36 foot waterline, wouldn’t the boat (at least theoretically) have a hull design speed of about 8 knots? [sqrt 36 = 6 x 1.34 = 8.02] Do you find that such boats won’t sail at the design speed? Sidney

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Outhaul Problems w/Roller Furling Main

I have a Hughes Northstar 80/20 ketch with a roller furled mainsail. This is obviously an aftermarket modification, and it is extremely difficult to unfurl and furl. The outhaul and furling lines by necessity are each routed around several blocks (around the boom, down the mast, across the deck, through a block, then to the cockpit) which greatly increases the mechanical
effort required to move the sail. At times we have had to use our large winch and are putting a lot of (hopefully) unnecessary strain on the lines, deck organizers and blocks. Our best efforts have resulted in still about a foot of slack in the outhaul line at the clew. This is my first experience with such a mainsail arrangement and I have no idea what is considered "normal" operation or configuration. In addition, the car to which the outhaul line is attached moved freely on the boom track until I hit on the idea to lock it in place using a second, locking slide. By keeping the car stationary, sail management improved a bit but it still seems to be much harder than it should be and requires two people pretty much dedicated to the mainsail during furling and unfurling. My original plan of sailing the boat shorthanded or singlehanded is now in question until I can resolve this problem.

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Posted by admin  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Prop Size

Hi, I’ve just finished your latest Storm Tactics, it’s grate.I’ve also read and loved your others. Can you tell me how to tell if my prop is sized properly.I own and am planing on cruising my Rob Perry designed Islander 32. It has a Westerbeak 25 hrs . My engine manual doesn’t say anything about max engine RPM. My current prop is a 12/14 two blade. At full throttel the RPM is 3400. I’m not sure what my hull speed should be,the waterline is 25′, and I can’t look it up in my Cruisers Encyclopedia because I lent it out and havent gotten it back.I can get .4 gal per hour and about 5kts at 1800 RPM. Is this too low of a power setting for long periods. Do deisel do better at higher settings. Is it hard on them to run at higher settings, say 3000 RPMs for extended periods.It seems that power settings above 2600 dont produce higher boat speeds.Any thaught on all the above would be a great help. Thanks

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Insulation Approaches for Alum. Hulls

Steve, First let me say I have appreciated the wealth of information in your books and website. Thanks!

In considering an aluminum hull for use primarily in the tropics and temperate zones, I was intrigued by your reference that on Beowulf you chose to use no insulation. You reference careful attention to the head and hull liners. Was there any attempt to provide insulation via the head and hull liners or did you just eliminate the insulation that would have otherwise been used and use standard liner materials? Also, you reference the reveals between the liner panels to promote ventilation between the liner and deck. Did you use a specific % of open space design spec, or just go more with looks? Given your experience in the tropics, would you go this route again, or use insulation? Anything else to consider if choosing to use no insulation?

Thanks for sharing your insights. David

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Steel Yacht Construction in China

I am looking for designs for a steel yacht capable of worldwide cruising and being handled by a couple. Your ideas on yacht design seem to be the same as mine, particularly those regarding the priorities of equipment, safety, layout, engine rooms and cutting down on the fancy junk.

I am a naval architect and master mariner and am stuck in China for the next four years building a series of cargo ships and tankers. I would like to occupy my spare time by building a yacht for what I hope will be my imminent retirement after 35 years of building ships. Thus the requirement for a steel design.

In China there is high quality and cheap steel available but limited skills in welding, I also have all the cutting and bending equipment available to me. I am thinking of a design of 75 to 80 feet overall, this is I think the limit that can be handled by a small crew, my wife is not a great sailor in terms of usefulness on deck, otherwise brilliant but just ballast on deck. I liked what I can see of your Locura, I am conservative, I like Beowulf but the rig is new to me. I was thinking of a staysail schooner? I would much appreciate your advice, ideas, design suggestions or even a suggestion for a complete design to fit my requirements. Many thanks and best regards, Paul

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Galley Sinks

My husband and I read articles on your site regularly. We have a 41-foot sailboat on a lake in New Mexico. Our plan is to retire in 3 years to go cruising. We have done extensive work on the boat to get her ready. I have looked everywhere for a deep, somewhat narrow double sink for the galley. I have seen these sinks on bareboat charter boats but have not been able to locate any. I would greatly appreciate any help you could give me. Thank you. Linda M

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Paying Off Boat While Cruising

Due to our professions, we both have wonderful retirement plans through state and county governments. However, we do NOT have enough cash to pay off the boat— not even close— before we leave. So, the question is: Do people go cruising while still making payments on their boat? Do any lenders allow this? We don’t want to ask our lender just yet because we don’t want to set off any alarms. Does anyone know of any lender that does allow you to take you boat out of the country? We have direct deposit of our paychecks each month, and the payment can be taken directly from the account.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Getting Ready to Go Cruising-What to Learn

Hello–My husband has gone off the “deep” end. He wants to sell everything we own and buy a 30-40′ sailboat and cruise the Pacific coast. I’m all for it, but I need to figure out how to prepare for an undertaking like this! Neither of us have ever sailed before, however, my husband is taking a 4-day ASA certification class in Seward, Alaska this summer and he has been commercial fishing in Alaska (Prince William Sound & Cook Inlet) for years. Please let me know of a book or a person who has gone from landlubber to sailor in a short period of time so I can start to figure out exactly what kinds of preparations we need to be making. The sooner the better–he wants to leave THIS summer! Thank you–Erin

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Cleaning Water Tanks

I have a catamaran and the water tanks are about 6′ long with several baffles to limit surging. There is only one access hatch on each tank at the aft end. There is now quite a lot of white scummy film lightly sticking to the sides and bottom. Although we don’t drink the tank water and only use it for washing, is there any way to (chemically) clean the tanks as I can’t physically reach most of the tanks surfaces to scrub them–recommendations on chemicals? The boat is based in Turkey.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Lightning Protection System

Hi Steve, Once again here I am at your information trough. Well, INTERLUDE is on the dry getting bottom job so I am going to address the long-overdue absence of some form of lightning protection. Here on the Mississippi Gulf coast, lightning damage is a very real threat, as my dock neighbor got a firsthand appreciation of the awesome damage a strike can inflict–all electronics shot, and a total of 72 exit points in the hull, 4 of which where about 1/4″ in diameter–2 below the waterline. Flooding was kept in check because the 2 major exit points occurred in integrated water tanks

INTERLUDE, a Hans Christian, Christina 40, has a deck stepped rig with all metal components except chainplates bonded together with #8 cable. Why they omitted the chain plates is beyond me, but I intend to address that in this project.

What I am proposing to do is construct a submersed ground plate, 5″ by 72″ of 3/16 or 1/4″ copper, connected thru the hull with silicon bronze 1/4″ or 5/16″ carriage bolt connectors and marine sealant every 8″ or so (overkill?). This satisfies the ISO ground plate standard of 2.5 sq. feet. The reasoning behind the plate dimension is that studies have shown that the edge surface of the conductor plays a very important part in strike dissipation. So, in an attempt to improve on the ISO standard, I have increased the exposed linear edge rather than just going with a square plate. To this plate via the carriage bolts, I will connect #4 cable to the compression post and #6 to the chain plates.

Now comes the problem of the mast to compression post connector. The aluminum mast sits on a stainless deck base which is through-bolted to the bronze compression post. Intuition tells me not to rely on this mechanical connection but weld a lug to the mast and again connect one of the stainless through-bolts to the mast with #4 cable which should insure a good low-resistance electrical path. At the masthead will be a rod sticking 6″ above the VHF antenna and for good measure, one of those bottle-brush dissipaters. OK, now I have that immersed chunk of copper. Will I be inviting cathodic problems if I include these components in the bonding system or should I isolate the lightning protection components (mast, stays, chainplates, compression post and ground plate) from the bonding system and let them reach their own electrical potential? What do you think of the solution? Thanks, so much. All the best to you, Linda and the family, Kevin, Bay St. Louis, MS.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Caribbean Weather

Good day! I was wondering if you would be able to refer me to an online source for understanding weather in the Caribbean–rainy season and dry season, and what exactly triggers the onset of each. Any direction you could give would be much appreciated! Thanks, Tim

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Satelite Cloud Imaging Systems

Hi Steve, I have just discovered your website, and via Ocean Navigator have ordered your storm tactics book (Surviving the Storm). We are preparing for a 14-month trip first from East Coast US to Europe, then down the clasic trading route to Brazil, and through the Strait of Magellan in January, & up the west coast of SA, returing home via Panama Canal and the Yucatan. I have had a lot of people recommend the Sea Station unit to us. It’s a lot to jam on a well-found 36 ketch, but I am tempted. It has weather fax through the SSB as part of the software. I would like your comments. Do you think this is any substitute in regions where weather fax is unavailable? It uses low power and is no big deal for the computer, so long as we have power. Many Thanks, Andy.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Columbia 43

Hi Steve, I’m reading Offshore Cruising Enc. at the moment, which is excellent. We are a couple in the mid 30’s and plan to set sail along the Tradewinds on a Columbia 43 (MK I – 1970) we have seen and plan to buy. As you started in a Columbia 50, we would appreciate your feelings about Columbia 43’s for Tradewind sailing (and maybe more in future). We are not too happy with the deep draft and the unprotected rudder, however, she seems safe, comfortable, with lots of room and most importantly, she would be in line with our budget for that size of waterline! Any thoughts? Thanks a lot !!! Stephan

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Finding THE BOAT

Hi Steve & Linda, Well we have made the first step!….I have resigned from my job and my wife has secured a two year leave of absence from her job (starting in July). Thanks in large part to you guys who have inspired us over the years we shall take our two kids 9 & 11 on a two year adventure. I am using the next 6 months to prepare the house for rent, sell my current boat (33′ too small) and buy THE BOAT. I have your book…it is my bedside companion…and have followed your website and FAQs. I’m going for waterline if I can find one in my budget–approx. $150K…we have been looking at the Hylas 44 and 47…your comments on this boat would be appreciated. We intend to spend 6 mos. in the Bahamas (our backyard) then on to the Caribbean. Many thanks!

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Removing the Mizzen

I am restoring a 1980 Cheoy Lee 44 Ketch. She currently has wood spars. I have been considering having a taller main aluminum mast made with a longer boom and removing the mizzen all together, running her as a sloop. Is this possible? P.S. Love your books!! Best Regards, Larry

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Rigging Costs

My husband and I are in the process of buying our first boat ever. We plan to live aboard while we learn to sail. I found a 1972 Challenger 40 for $29,000. It has a 13’10” beam and is really well laid out–we’d be quite comfortable living in it. However, it needs all of the rigging replaced. We just read an article in Cruising World about the costs of refitting a boat which gave a rigging replacement estimate of $10,000. In your opinion, do you think this would be worth it? We don’t mind investing elbow grease and gear costs, but we also don’t want to “go down with the ship” on this! Thank you! Erin

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Dinghy Sailor Wants to Go Cruising

Hi Steve- I read a question in the Q&A section of cruising central. It was the one where you said that getting into sailing dinghies for a summer would be comparable to sailing a larger boat for a few years. I already know how to sail and I sailed a dinghy as a youngster. Now I’d like to get into cruising 30-40 footers long distances. Would dinghy racing also benefit me as far as learning and experience in sailing? There are many dinghy fleets here in San Diego that I could readily join. I’m a 50-year-old guy and I’d like to become a capable cruiser before I’m too old. Thank you very very much for your valued guidance. Kevin

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Alpha 3000 Autopilot

Dear Steve and Linda, My wife and I finally made the big jump and are sailing around the world. We’re now in Lisbon, Portugal. A friend of ours lent us your book, Offshore Cruising Encyclopedia. It’s wonderful, and we look forward to borrowing it again. We read with great interest your comments about the Alpha 3000 as this is our primary autopilot. (We have no wind vane) So far we’ve had only minor problems which were turned into major problems when the unit was returned to the company for repairs. Mostly due to Barron and now Chris, who refuses to even give out his last name. The company’s mode of operation is beyond my comprehension. We’re wondering if you could give us any input as to what we can do to keep our autopilot working in the best possible fashion without returning it to the factory. Thanking you in advance. Our wishes to you and your family for a Happy Holiday season and your best New Years ever. Harold

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

BEOWULF Design Questions

I love your design concepts of fast cruising sailboats designed to be handled by a couple. I have a few questions that, if you have the time, I would love to get answered.

I have read your design paper for BEOWULF and it looks like a terrific boat. How is the water ballast working out and do you ever worry about having all that ballast on the wrong side in the event of an accidental jibe? What do you think of the use of carbon fiber, particularly in masts? And have you considered the use of a free-standing mast? What do you think of the Fox 50 concept of converting an Around Alone Open 50 design to an ultra-fast cruising boat? I think they were to be built by TPI and Lyman Morse, although after the initial hoo-ha I have not heard anything about them. They seem to take your concepts a step farther, but perhaps too far.

Thanks, Pete

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Snuffer

I’m about to order a gennaker for my Sabre 402 and have been trying to decide between your snuffer and ATN’s. For dousing, ATN recommends blowing the tack before pulling the snuffer down. If I am reading your response to Doug Peters’s question about this, you seem to be recommending easing the sheet. Having had some difficulty doing this with the non-ATN, non-North snuffer on my last boat, ATN’s idea seems sensible to me. Is there a reason I couldn’t take this approach with your snuffer?

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Posted by admin  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Webbing Rode

We have purchased a Stevens 47 and the stern Danforth anchor has all webbing rode stowed on a reel. Do you have any knowledge of the adequacy of this rode? How does it stand up to UV? It has been coiled for probably years and never used as far as I can tell. – George

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Deck Fills

Hi Steve, What do you use for deck fills on an aluminum deck? Are the Marelon fills a good choice, or aluminum (Wilcox-Crittenden) welded on? Could I just weld in pipe with threaded ends and put a cap on the outside (keeps the opening off the deck)? Also, would you let bails for halyard/reef blocks through the deck and weld top and bottom, or do you think there’s enough strength in a fillet weld to hold it on the deck? Best, Alex

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Anodize Vs Painting

I have the opportunity to replace the spars (2) on my boat. It is a 1975 Custom 45′ Steel boat built in Italy (round chine). It has a flush deck. I have been using your encyclopedia to spec out the spars but I’m not clear on your opinion of anodizing Vs painting. To have my spars anodized (about 55 ft worth) will require a mechanically fastened joint. (tanks not long enough for the whole spar). Cost- wise, it’s about a wash. What’s your opinion?

I appreciate your help as I’m a new boat owner and a novice sailor. Your book has been a great help to me and I think the spar maker has learned a few things as well. I’m looking forward to your next book (heavy weather sailing). It sounds good from the ad. Have you thought of making a training film on the subject? Thanks for your help, Steve. Regards, Buzz

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Ventilation Systems

Steve, I’ve been reading your great site and wanted to ask a few questions/make a few comments. With ventilation systems (including conditioned air)? You don’t seem to use ducted systems, is there any reason for this? In my experience (non-marine), dual 6-inch (15cm) ducts would be adequate for the living area sizes you have. I’m not thinking of round ducts, but more a box section mounted in the ‘eaves’ area. Your thoughts? – Craig

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Lathe on Board?

Good afternoon. This may be totally off the wall. But, would there be much of a use for a small metal lathe in a cruising situation? For making spare parts for my boat or better yet, making parts for other boats and getting paid for it? Thanks for any insight you will provide. David

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Cruising Music

One day I would like to own a BEOWULF class boat, but in the meantime do you have any info on the music that is played on the BEOWULF video–would like to purchase–thanks-JIM

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Cruising Insurance

How do you get insurance to sail as a couple on BEOWULF? I have friends with a Tayana 52 in Hawaii, who are now kind of stranded because their Lloyds policy requires four crew and the other couple (the guy actually) wimped while they were all headed for NZ. Or do you sail bare (which is what I am doing right now as a singlehander)? -Lesley

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Using Engine as a Genset

What do you think about glazing up the pistons with running the engine so much with no load on it (my father is an engineer with a tractor manufacturer!)? Swan says run your engine occasionally up to 3400rpm and get the soot out!! Sounds pretty scary? What do you think? Regards Phillip

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

South African Weatherfaxes

Hi, I’m unable to locate a weatherfax for the South African coastline and immediate area. Please advise. Martin.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Columbia 50

I believe your first cruising boat (Intermezzo) was a Columbia 50? Knowing this boat a little, what were the traits about it that you really liked, and really disliked? Thanks for your reply,

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Lancer 65

I would like to find and visit a Lancer 65 powersailor. They are rare and hard to find. Your recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!–Lew

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Staysail Stay Made of Kevlar

Dear Mr. Dashew: November 2001 Sail magazine contains an article by naval architect Roger Marshall titled "Seamanship in High Winds" in which he states (page 36), “…I believe that every boat that is intending to go offshore should have a staysail stay, possibly made of aramid, on which to set the storm jib.” My question concerns the nature of such a staysail stay made of aramid. Could this be as simple as an aramid halyard attached to a folding padeye on deck made tight with a winch? (Assuming the geometry of the aramid halyard/staysail stay would be acceptable using the topping lift sheave, for example.) If so, such an arrangement might appeal to coastal cruisers such as myself, who would like to have the option of using a hanked-on storm jib on a staysail stay but have difficulty justifying a conventional staysail stay installation due to its low frequency or probability of use.

If my understanding, as set out above, of what Mr. Marshall intends is correct, how satisfactory would such an arrangement be in actual use? Do you believe this would be a good option for coastal cruisers such as myself? (I realize the scope of my question ignores additional important considerations like keeping the mast in column, possibly using running backstays or swept-back spreaders, etc. and the structural concerns of the deck handling the loads.) If such an installation is a reasonable approach, I am sure you can see the potential appeal for some cruisers. If one were lucky, installation might be as simple as installing a folding padeye on deck, replacing the topping lift with aramid line run to an appropriate winch (assuming the topping lift sheave is located opposite upper swept back spreaders) and buying a storm jib with hanks. Wishful thinking? As always, thank you for your assistance.—Downing Mears

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Reefing Trysails

Hi Steve, In Surviving the Storm you suggest that yachts under 40 feet will find that they should set the trysail instead of a second reef when the wind gets into the upper 20-knot range. You also suggest that a small trysail is needed for really heavy air. Is this a contradiction? And can it be resolved by using a reefing trysail? I know Donald Street advocated this and I see that the Pardeys used a reefing trysail in their recent trip around the Horn. But apart from these two examples I’ve never seen reference to reefing trysails in any of the literature. What are the pros and cons of reefing trysails in your view? Love your books, David

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Sail Draft–Definition

Dear Dashews, Got your book. great reading. But it lacks one thing: a glossary. I suspect some terms are US conventions and not European (e.g. dink). What is meant by draft (in respect of sails) for example. Best Wishes, Malcolm S

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Keel Shape & Performance

Hi Steve, As part of researching for a suitable boat I’ve read the articles about keel and foil design at www.vacantisw.com as well as your description of using a NACA 0000 foil shape with a 15% foil section in Offshore Cruising Encyclopedia. Can you tell me in general terms how much a foil shaped keel improves boat performance compared to one that has no foil, ie. the sides of the keel are parallel? Is this difference enough to warrant keeping away from boats without foil keels? Thx, DM

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Draft Issues for Cruising

Thanks Steve, for the comments on teak decks. I am just about to make an offer on an 85 ft Formosa, and I know the decks will need doing in a few years, so I will adjust my offer. The other misgiving I have is the 9′ 6″ draft. I sailed half way round the world a few years ago, going East. This time I am going through the Panama Canal and then the Pacific–could you comment on the draft , please? John

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Feathering Props

Question: I was going to install a feathing prop on my Nautic Saintongue 44 during this spring’s haul-out. Presently, I have postponed this investment because I met a couple in La Paz this winter who had a feathering prop on a Passport about the same displacement as my boat. I asked them if the prop (maxi) was working for them. They replied that if they had to consider it again, they would not do it again. Basicially it was not worth the investment.

So, what is your opinion on replacing a fixed three blade with a maxi type prop? From manufacturers reports I have read, an increase in speed will be realized, but on a 25,000 lb. displacement boat, is the investment worth it? I do not race, but like to get from one place to the next as quickly as possible.

What prop has worked best for your boats over the years? Mike

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Anchor Chain Storage

I am doing an extensive refit of an old Pearson Coaster (30ft) with the goal of doing some extensive cruising. One problem I have been attempting to solve is the storage of the anchor chain. I know were I want to store it, in the keel, but getting it there is the problem.

I want to deliver the chain to the keel from the windless through a PVC pipe to the keel. My theory is that the PVC pipe is something that should be considered a wear item. I would be installing it in such a way that it can be easily replaced. Thus far I have isolated that I need a minimum slope of 12 degrees and that I need to use a pipe size of 1 1/2″ ID for the 1/4″ High Test chain. The next size smaller PVC pipe, 1 1/4″ ID, is just the right size that if a link rolls up the chain will jam.

This appears to me as though I might be going about this from the wrong direction. I don’t have any experience in this area and something doesn’t feel right about my solution.

If anyone has had any experience in this area and would be willing to share any suggestions, they would be most welcome. If I am going about this from the wrong direction, please tell me, and if there is a better way to approach this problem, that I would also like to know. Thank you in advance, Fred C.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Steel Hull–Wooden Decks in Extreme Weather

Hello, I’m looking at purchasing a yacht capable of offshore voyages in and around the Southern Ocean, I have found one which suits all my requirements except this steel yacht has a wooden deck and cockpit. Would this partial wooden construction compromise the structural strength of the yacht given worst-case scenarios in big seas? Marcus

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Alcohol Stoves

I was wondering if you could help me with information concerning Origo alcohol stoves. I use my boat for limited coastal cruising in the Channel Islands, CA. My boat is a Dreadnought 32 without a LPG system. Stove prices are comparable but for LPG I would spend $1,000 more for lockers, solenoids etc. I can’t find any performance or convenience info on these non-pressurized alcohol systems. Can you advise me?

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Harness Combination

I am currently reading your book Surviving the Storm. In the personal safety gear section you do not mention or opine on the harness PFD combination. What are your thoughts on this product? Dwayne C

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Cruiser’s Medical Courses

Could you please recommend medical courses for blue water cruisers going to remote areas, that take place preferably on the west coast of the US and on weekends before 4/1/01? I’m aware of some excellent 2-week courses, but just can’t fit those into our schedule at this point. Thanks, Doanne

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Smelly Sea Chests

Hi SetSail! Following Steve’s lead when building our 50′ catamaran, PAPILLON, we installed sea chests to supply salt water to the watermaker, refrigerator, galley sink and head (stbd side) and genset, head, and deck wash (port). While at dock in Ft. Myers Beach (Estero River) this winter, the water from the starboard side has developed an awful stench–this despite: (a) daily turnover of the water in the sea chest through the refrigeration system (Glacier Bay), (b) cleaning of the chest itself about every 3 weeks, and (c) daily flushing of the head. The water at the sink and head are the real problems, due to sulfur smell. Have you experienced this type of problem, and what can you suggest? (The port side is rarely used and has been left filled with fresh water to delay the onset of the problem.) Thanks! – Julia P

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Pinholes in Stainless Steel Water Tanks

Dear Steve and Linda: Your Offshore Cruising Encyclopedia was extremely helpful to me when I was outfitting my BCC “Calliste” for extended cruising in 1998. Currently in Tin Can Bay, Qld., Australia, on hard stand, repairing a gelcoat failure and discovering other maintainance problems as well.

I have removed her two ss water tanks and was using a welder’s Ss pickling paste to remove the rust that developed around the welds on the outside of the tank. This revealed some deep pitting in some places, what looks to be a depth about half the thickness of the metal. Having trouble on deciding what to do, got any ideas to pass along ???

Have been enjoying your web site and will continue to do so, when we depart OZ. Sincerely, Douglas

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Weather Logic–BVI to Bermuda

Hi Steve, We were planning to leave for Bermuda tomorrow, but just received a WX report from Commanders that’s a bit scary. They are predicting the “largest storm of the season” over Bermuda this Thurs and Fri. Are suggesting we can get there before it hits, but I’m not sure about that. And even if we get in safely, will have to anchor in St. George’s sufficiently well to withstand 55 knots, according to them. We asked Herb about the storm tonight, but he refused to comment, saying Fri is too far off. I can’t see the warning signs on the 96hr 500mb (maybe they’re over the West Coast now?), but I confess I’m still not great at understanding the 500mb charts, your Mariner’s Weather Handbook notwithstanding. We have no deadlines, no pressure to leave, except for a fridge full of food! What do you think, O Great Seer of the 500mb charts? Commanders says if we don’t leave tomorrow, we should wait till Tuesday, and will be motoring most of the way. By the way, David Jones has not warned our friends about this at all (they’re using him for routing), and they’re expecting to arrive in Bermuda Thurs or Fri as well.

Sorry to trouble you, but I would appreciate your opinion. By the way, we’re in Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbor, and BEOWULF looks in great shape over there in the yard. Regards, Candace

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)

Australian Weather on the Web

New Wx book a bargain at twice the price. I am reading it for the third time. Do you know where I can download (from the web) wx fax for south pacific? I have friends at 16S 155W headed for Australia. I would like to watch their weather, but cannot find any source for that area. Any help will be appreciated. Best, Jamie

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 30, 1999)    |    Comments (0)