FPB 64 Updates

The following articles cover the FPB 64 construction sequence. You will find hundreds of detailed photos with explanations covering every phase of the build cycle. Scroll down to the bottom to see the first articles.

Awnings

Awnings are a critical part of comfortable cruising in the tropics as well as in cooler environments.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 15, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64 – Second Series Changes & Options

With the first series of FPB 64s nearing completion we have been hard at work on fine tuning what is arguably close to the ultimate cruising tool.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 15, 2011)    |    Comments (2)

FPB64 Construction Update, September 30-2011

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We are back from a brief hiatus and are snowed with a desk full of projects. But as your weekend is approaching, and football is so far less than exemplary (at Least in Tucson), we thought a few construction photos might help pass the time. We’ll start with FPB64-6, above, now well along in its metal phase.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 1, 2011)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64 Vs Reef – Are The Factors Of Safety Sufficient?

“Having a boat that can deal with whatever might happen—no matter what—provides a mental comfort level that defines their view of happy sailing.”
–Bill Parlatore, Passagemaker Magazine

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The various rules to which yachts are built are based on seagoing loads. If you design to ABS or Lloyd’s, odds are you will be OK  offshore, but there is little extra margin for the mistakes which are a part  of cruising. With an ABS keel structure, if you go aground, it is almost certain a trip to the boat yard is in your immediate future. But if you engineer to four times ABS, you are probably going to continue with your cruising.

We have tested these these theories ourselves, and had our owners repeatedly test them on our sailing designs. Now we have some real world verification of the FPB 64’s factors of safety.

The photos which follow were taken of one of the FPB 64s after it tangled with a reef in the Fiji Islands. She has been hauled to replace a damaged stabilizer fin. At the end of this post is a link to the details of the event which has some excellent lessons for us all.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 9, 2011)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 #5 Topped Out – #7 Construction Starts

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We have been behind in our reports on how the FPB 64 production is progressing. This batch of photos were taken during August and the first week of September. The lead photo is, in construction industry parlance, the “topping out” of FPB 64-5. The jig built roof structure is being lowered over the window mullions. Very precise construction is required for these elements to fit together.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 8, 2011)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 Get Home System – The Solution

Traditional get home systems on single screw powerboats are typically not very functional. They tend to deliver 50 to 60% of the normal cruising speed in calm conditions, and be essentially useless in a stiff breeze fighting a head sea. This has made no sense to us. Why pay the weight, cost, and drag penalties, and make life more difficult maintenance wise in the engine room, if you can only accomplish what can be done with a dinghy acting as a tug? Especially since we have a get home sail.

If we were going to have a diesel powered system we wanted to have a respectable passaging speed, and the ability to make progress to windward in less than ideal conditions.

We now have that system.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (August 12, 2011)    |    Comments (15)

FPB 64 # 5 and 6 Update July 22

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Here is a batch of photos from last week on FPB 64s five and six. We will start with putting lead into the bottom  of number five.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 27, 2011)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64 #5 and #6 Progress

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Progress continues in New Zealand on FPB 64s # five and six, with five being fully plated now.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 8, 2011)    |    Comments (2)

FPB 64s #5 & 6 Making Progress

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Todd and Steve are sitting in a very warm Charleston, South Carolina wrapping up details on the FPB 112 and it is hard to relate to these winter photos from New Zealand. As you will see, FPB 64 five and six are rapidly taking form. These photos cover the first two weeks in June.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 17, 2011)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64-4 Osprey – Dealing With Storm Force Winds (updated)

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Steve Suters, John Gowing’s FPB 64-4 captain, has been kind enough to fill us in on some of the details of their recent brush with storm force winds (55 to 65 knots), steep seas, and a breaking entrance bar crossing. We have included the photo above of FPB64-1, Avatar, as a reminder of boat scale versus the waves about which you will shortly read. A the end of the blog are two short videos.

As you go through the following keep in mind one key fact: this was taking place in an area of south flowing current, opposing the wind driven waves, steepening them and causing them to break.

 

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 7, 2011)    |    Comments (8)

FPB 64-4 Osprey Video Wave Analysis

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We’ve been going through the very short video we have posted on Osprey’s adventure, and found a few interesting waves. As previously mentioned, the steepness of the seas is a result of current opposing the wind. Note that these were taken before it started to really blow, i.e. the breeze here is 35 to 40 knots and it blew up to 65 later on, and that photos always visually shrink wave size.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 7, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64-2 Sarah Sarah – Kayak Racks

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Bill and Sue Henry, owners of FPB 64-2 Sarah Sarah, are the first to make use of the threaded inserts on the house sides for kayak storage. If you look carefully at this lovely photo, sent in by Brian Rickard (as are the others), you will see one of the kayaks stored just above the windows.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 3, 2011)    |    Comments (14)

FPB 64s # Five and Six Construction Details

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We look at photos of FPB 64s under construction typically on a weekly basis. And although we have seen this many times before, with older designs, and with the FPBs, we still get a buzz. The long time SetSailors amongst you will have been through this with us as well, but it has been a year or more, so we are going to post updates from time to time. If we are totally boring you, protest, and we will take theshowing under advisement.

Starting with the pointy end, the Circa fabricators are getting ready to tack on rolled plate.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 1, 2011)    |    Comments (7)

FPB 64 #5 and #6 Getting Up A Head Of Steam

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You are looking at the Circa computerized cutting table at work on the jigsaw of aluminum pieces that will shortly become FPB 64 number six. The production process  is rolling at Circa, and there are some details to share including a short video.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (May 15, 2011)    |    Comments (14)

FPB 64 Doings and Owner’s Blogs

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With four FPB 64s + the FPB 83 prototype WInd Horse now cruising, the fifth boat under construction, and two more awaiting their start, FPB cruising news is starting to filter in. We thought a brief recap and some links might be of interest.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (May 9, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

Iron Lady In A Full Gale To The Tropics

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If the sea trial photo above has you wondering how the FPB 64 handles heavy weather – say seas three times this size and 30 to 40 knots of wind – we have a couple of e-mails from Pete Rossin aboard Iron Lady, to sate your curiosity. Pete and Debbie, and crew Steve, are on their way north to the Islands. They left New Zealand with the intention of riding a bit of gale force pressure north, and getting in a few rides in the process.

There are three e-mails from Pete that follow. Read the rest »


Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 18, 2011)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64-3 Video #3 and #4 – More Play In A Gale

While the Arizona Wildcats were thrashing Duke in basketball, we were out in the remnants of another New Zealand gale with Iron Lady. For company there were eighteen visitors from around the world (three parties of six). It had been blowing from the east for two days, so as you might imagine, the combination of  shoaling bottom, reflected waves, and river mouth currents made for an interesting mix.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 25, 2011)    |    Comments (8)

Iron Lady Sea Trial Video #2

While we were busy marveling at how well Iron Lady handled the previously mentioned vigorous sea state, her owner, Pete Rossin, shot a couple of minutes of video.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 23, 2011)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64-3 Iron Lady Profiles

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We have just received a few photos of Iron Lady which we thought might be of interest.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (February 25, 2011)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 Hinged Masts

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Over the last couple of years we have had numerous questions about the FPB 64’s hinged mast system. This is a costly exercise compared to a fixed rig.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (February 5, 2011)    |    Comments (5)

Get Home System – The Solution

None of the conventional approaches to get home systems in use today have the ingredients to meet our expectations. They all have shortcomings which we feel make them unacceptable. This led us to develop our get home sailing rig which in combination with a powerful dinghy tied alongside for close to harbor propulsion is a reasonable compromise.

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Now, with the swim step extension, there is another option which makes the FPB 64 get home system even better.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 11, 2011)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 – Second Series Options

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With the first run of FPB 64s nearing completion we have been at work on a few options for the next group of boats, most of which are retrofittable to the first run. We have also updated the drawings closer to the real world, the originals being somewhat out-of-date.

Let’s start with the back end of the boat.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 29, 2010)    |    Comments (18)

Sarah Sarah Video – Sea State Analysis New Zealand To Puget Sound

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Brian Rickard was aboard the FPB64 Sarah Sarah on her recent passage from New Zealand to Washington’s Puget Sound. Along the way Brian accumulated video so that we would have a chance to evaluate how Sarah Sarah did in various sea states. This was never intended for general public viewing, but the videos are so informative we thought you might like to share them. And if you are really into the yacht design and the real world of ocean crossing think of this as an early Holiday present.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 28, 2010)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 Sarah Sarah Punch List

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Here is something so unusual we had to share it. Readers of this website will be familiar with the second FPB 64’s quick exit from New Zealand and subsequent passage to the Pacific Northwest of the USA. With less than 100 hours of sea time she set off on a 6000+ mile shakedown cruise. This is what makes for prematurely bald boat builders.

When Sarah Sarah arrived in Seattle of course there was a punch list  of warranty items. New boat, 7000 total miles in the first 100 days, you can imagine the yard bill.

Or can you.

What would you guess? $50,000? $25,000?

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 3, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

Sarah Sarah Landfall

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The second FPB 64, Sarah Sarah, is resting quietly in Neah Bay, Washington, having made landfall at 21:34 UTC.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 17, 2010)    |    Comments (6)

Sarah Sarah – Last Day At Sea?

FPB 64 #2, Sarah Sarah, is within a day of putting finish to their passage. The crew must be relaxing as they have sent in a long report, which follows.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 16, 2010)    |    Comments (1)

Sarah Sarah – Finishing On A High

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AIRMAIL YOTREPS
IDENT: WDF4288
TIME: 2010/10/16 00:00
LATITUDE: 43-37.351N
LONGITUDE: 133-22.67W
COMMENT: Partly to mostly cloudy, air 58°F, sea 61°F (corrected temperatures), 1026 mb, wind light/variable, 0.7m swell from NW with no wind waves.

As you will note from the report above Sarah Sarah has positioned herself under the benign influence of a high pressure system (1026 mb) to complete her passage. Boat and crew are well, and plans are being coordinated for friends and family to meet her as she makes landfall.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 16, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

Sarah Sarah – Getting Closer

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Sarah Sarah and her intrepid crew are entering their seventh day a sea from Hawaii. The predicted frontal passage has occurred, just a bit early. Boat speed and good weather routing now has Sarah Sarah positioned within the influence of a high pressure system. They should be able to make their landfall without further frontal boundaries and their gales.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 14, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

Sarah Sarah Update – Half Way Party

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Having completed their fifth day at sea Sarah Sarah’s crew is undoubtedly celebrating having half of the 2275 nautical miles to the Straights of Juan de Fuca behind them (actual distance with weather jogs is likely to be closer to 2400 miles). According to Rick Shema (see below) they have one more frontal passage, perhaps gale force, and then the long range forecast is quite good considering the time of year and location.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 13, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

Sarah Sarah – Back Up To Speed

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After a brief period of heading north of the rhumbline during a frontal passage Sarah Sarah is back on track for the Straights of Juan de Fuca. From her satcom update:

TIME: 2010/10/11 23:59
LATITUDE: 33-47.92N
LONGITUDE: 149-29.92W
COMMENT: Back on rhumbline to C. Flattery @ 15:23Z, ave. 9.6 kts.  Overcast, occas. rain, air 68°F, sea 76°F, 1023 mb*, wind SE at 18 kts.*, 1.2m swell from E

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 12, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

Sarah Sarah Update-Challenging Conditions

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The second FPB 64, Sarah Sarah, has had an uneventful trip weather wise between New Zealand and Hawaii. Aside from a day spent in confused large beam seas, the boat and crew have not been challenged, at least from a design standpoint. A leg like Hawaii towards Seattle will be different. It is going to present them with a variety of confused sea-states, which will test the ability of the boat to maintain its average passage speed,(speed, as you know, is the holy grail of safe passagemaking, especially in the fall crossing the North Pacific). A few comments from the boat, and Rick Shema, their weather router, follow:

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 11, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64-2 Sarah Sarah Final Leg Across The Pacific

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The second FPB 64, Sarah Sarah, is on her way from Hawaii towards Seattle, a 2300 mile passage. The crew just sent in the report which follows.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 8, 2010)    |    Comments (2)

Sarah Sarah Is In Oahu, Hawaii

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Sarah Sarah is berthed at the Hawaii Yacht Club on Oahu. Prior to turning in they sent us a few photos of Palmyra Atoll (above), Pango (at the end of this blog), and the trip up.

Preliminary data indicates that for the last leg, across the hurricane belt, Sarah Sarah averaged 9.8 knots turning 1750 to 1800 RPM, with top surfing speed of 14.7 knots. Average fuel burn reported by the engine’s CPU was 4.5 US gallons / 17 liters per hour. Good going guys!

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 30, 2010)    |    Comments (2)

Sarah Sarah On The Way To Hawaii

Following is the latest report from the second FPB 64, Sarah Sarah as they make their way towards Hawaii.

We’ve had some partially clear nights lately, and with the Moon approaching full, we could oftentimes clearly see the clouds and waves, which made night watches much more interesting. We didn’t encounter any more vessels after our last report, three days out of Pago Pago, American Samoa.

On September 21st, at 19:16 UTC (8:16 in the morning by ship’s clock), we crossed the Equator and entered the Northern Hemisphere at a longitude of 161°43.88’W. This marked Bill’s first ocean crossing of the equator, and he joined John and Brian in the ranks of “shell-backs,” being a “pollywog” no longer.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 26, 2010)    |    Comments (1)

Sarah Sarah Reporting From American Samoa

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The crew of the second FPB 64, Sarah Sarah, have just arrived in American Samoa from New Zealand, after a brief stop in Nieu along the way. Brian Rickard has just sent us a batch of photos to go with their reports, which follow.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (September 14, 2010)    |    Comments (1)

FPB 64 Avatar Logs Update

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Carol and Mike Parker have updated their cruising logs with a series of entries from Vanuatu. Click here to see their latest.


Posted by Steve Dashew  (August 23, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64 #2, Sarah-Sarah, Is Afloat

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A lovely photo taken by Ed Firth of Circa, showing what every owner, builder, and designer looks forward to – launch day. This is Sarah-Sarah, the second FPB 64, destined shortly for a trip from New Zealand to the Pacific Northwest, on her own bottom of course.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 13, 2010)    |    Comments (4)

Five Year Old Watermaker – How Is It Doing

We are on our first “passage” from Poole to Plymouth in the UK. While short, it is giving us a chance to run up some of the systems and electronics. In particular we wanted to test our five year old Village Marine NF800 watermaker which has been in storage mode for eight months

 

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 1, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64 Photo Details

We’re on a roll with this new photo server. So, for our third offering here are one hundred and one details. You will find everything from

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 26, 2010)    |    Comments (3)

Great Room 2

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Having had a practice photo shoot with Avatar’s great room we tried again yesterday morning with better results. A few of these photos are attached (we’ll have a high resolution slide show online later this week).

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 4, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

The Great Room

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Last night we had a chance to photograph the great room aboard Avatar for the first time. This is a test run – we’ll do better with practice – but we know there are a lot of folks waiting on these photos so we are going to post them anyway.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 2, 2010)    |    Comments (2)

The Office

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One of the design goals for the FPB 64 was a space that would function as an office. Having just spent the last 24 hours cruising aboard Avatar and using this space we can tell you it works really well.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 2, 2010)    |    Comments (2)

Flying Bridge Tour

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We’ve had several e-mails this week asking about the flying bridge. Time is short today so we’ll just load the photos for your viewing pleasure before we head down to the boat.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (April 1, 2010)    |    Comments (8)

Update 36 – Owner’s Suite

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A quick look today at the Owner’s suite.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 24, 2010)    |    Comments (1)

Update 35 – A Brief Tour

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We’ve been showing you build photos for so long we figured might as well give you a look at things during the last few days the first FPB 64 is coming together (before she is ready to “show”). It is amazing what being able to look outside the great room windows does for the feeling of spaciousness.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 20, 2010)    |    Comments (5)

FPB 64 Update 34 – On Her Lines

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First photos of Avatar afloat. She is in light ship trim plus tools, ground tackle, and dinghy. There is just 1500 liters of fuel aboard, and some water. Note the clean wake at slow speed.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 18, 2010)    |    Comments (8)

FPB 64 Update #33

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We’re getting close! Circa are starting to remove the protective coverings on the cabinets and prep the boat for launching. You are looking here at the galley.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 11, 2010)    |    Comments (5)

FPB 64 Update #32

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You are looking at the Murphy mechanical gauges in the engine room. Notice that the center “Engine Oil Pressure” is reading 50 PSI. The engine is being tested (along with all the other systems).

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (March 8, 2010)    |    Comments (2)

FPB 64 Update #31

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The final assembly of the first of the FPB 64s is at a fever pitch right now. The head and hull liners are now installed, and the last of the furniture modules is in place.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (February 26, 2010)    |    Comments (2)

FPB 64 Update # 30

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Lots to share this week including another sign that the first FPB 64 is getting close, the deck tread is being installed.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (February 19, 2010)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64 Update # 29

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Trying to get a feel for the interior of a boat under construction is difficult. Furniture is covered, lighting is bad, there are no embellishments to give the image a finished look. But now that the upholstery is starting to go into the first FPB 64 you will be able to get sense for the space. The photo above is taken from the aft end of the port side guest suite.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (February 12, 2010)    |    Comments (2)

Update 28

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We’ve got a lot of photos to share in this update, starting with the now installed bridge electrical panel. Our philosophy has always been that we want the hidden stuff to look as good as that which is exposed. It costs a little bit more, but the pleasure knowing that things are done right, and look good, even when out of sight, is well worth the cost to us. This gives us more of a buzz than the front side.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (February 7, 2010)    |    Comments (6)

Update 27

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Here’s an image to set your heart aflutter (with a little imagination). Add the sun/rain awning to the framework, move to a lovely anchorage in the tropical South Pacific, insert puffy cumulous clouds, coconut palms, and translucent warm water, and then relax with a cold drink and good book.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 30, 2010)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64 Update 26 – Electrical Panel Installation

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We’ve got a new batch of photos covering the electric panel details which we thought you might find of interest. We’ll start with the panel adjacent (to starboard) of the main helm.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 25, 2010)    |    Comments (1)

FPB 64 Update # 25

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When you see the “sparky” (Kiwi speak for electrician) working on the outside lighting and electronics it is a sign launching is within six to eight weeks. This photo also demonstrates the advantage of a hinged mast (aside from vertical clearance). It makes maintenance and changing electronics easier.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 19, 2010)    |    Comments (1)

Single Vs Twin Engines and the Get Home Conundrum

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We’ve been discussing various design considerations with a client headed for Tierra del Fuego and the Antarctic and thought some of the dialog might be of interest. We’ll start with the logic behind single vs. twin engines, and get home systems.

Everyone wants the safest, most reliable yacht. The question is how do you achieve this? Contrary to what you may think budget is usually not a major factor. Clear thinking about the risks and rewards of various approaches is the key ingredient.

Lets start with the risks as we see them, and our approach to reducing or eliminating these.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 8, 2010)    |    Comments (10)

Year End Recap On The FPB 64 Program

4 FPB 64s at once

If you look closely into the three open bays at Circa in the photo above you will count four FPB 64s under construction. Hull four is well along in its framing while hull three has its metalwork almost completed. Hull two has the bulkheads installed, systems work is coming along, and a good start has been made on the furniture. As detailed last week in report 23, the first of the FPB 64s is starting to go through systems testing, a sure sign that sea trials are not far off.

If you are behind on your visits to SetSail on the sidebar to the right you will find 50 posts under FPB Series notes, with another 28 reports under FPB Updates. The Dashew Offshore website has 65 articles detailing the FPB concept along with information on the Deerfoot, Sundeer, and Beowulf design series.

We look forward to bringing you the latest information in the New Year as hull number one of the FPB 64 Series nears it date with the Pacific Ocean.


Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 22, 2009)    |    Comments (0)

FPB 64 Update 24 – Seeing the Light

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One of the more difficult design areas on the FPBs has been the forward “mast”. It does a number of jobs, some of which conflict with each other and/or different requirements. We’ve been fiddling with this on the FPB prototype Wind Horse since launching. What you see here is the result of that thinking and experience.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 18, 2009)    |    Comments (9)

FPB 64 Progress Report 23 – Another Milestone

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The first FPB 64 reached a significant milestone this week, indicated by the photo above. The red Murphy sight gauge with level alarms provides an important clue. There is now oil in the engine. But wait, there’s more.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 11, 2009)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 Update 22A – The Engine Room

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There are so many photos to share from our recent trip to New Zealand that we’ll do update #22 as a series of which this the first (to be followed over the next few days by further updates and posts under the FPB 64 Series Notes category).

While it is difficult to ascertain the quality of most of of Circa’s work on the FPB 64s from construction photos, the engine room being nearly completed gives us a hint of what is to come throughout the boat. These photos do not begin to give what you really feel – but short of a visit to New Zealand they will have to suffice.

As mentioned elsewhere, it is difficult in the extreme to have a functional and aesthetic engine room. There are so many hoses, pipes, wires, and pieces of gear that a beautiful result takes patience, dedication, a lot of effort, and the willingness to do things over – sometimes three or four times. Most builders do not even try. They simply hide the messy looking stuff. The problem with this approach is that it also hides the problems. We have always preferred to expose everything, where we can clean and keep an eye on all of it.

The lead photo (above) is taken from the aft starboard corner, looking diagonally across the engine room towards the forward port corner.

Consider this and the photos which follow in the context of how this engine room will look when the floorboards are covered with the same material as the galley soles, permanent lighting is installed and work lights and their wires are removed, and the Owners have strategically places lovely artwork on the bulkheads. The end result

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (December 4, 2009)    |    Comments (1)

FPB 64 Update 22B – Interior

FPB64-Interior-Nov-20-09-101

This is the second in a series of reports on our November visit to Circa in New Zealand. In this blog we’ll deal with the interior of the first FPB 64 (the preceding report covers the engine room).

It takes some imagination to jump from a yacht under construction to what the completed boat will be. When viewing these photos keep in mind the lovely view out the 17 great room windows, now add sophisticated counter tops, finish the galley lockers, install flooring, and fit head and hull liners upholstered in Ultraleather to your mental picture (or review some of the FPB 83 interior photos). The result will be stunning.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 24, 2009)    |    Comments (10)

FPB 64 Update 22C – Forepeak

FPB-64-Forepeak-Nov-20-09-100

The forepeak has always been a key design element in our designs (both sail and power), and this continues with the FPB 64. Although there are systems in this area, the key function of the forepeak is storage.

Drop down the ladder with us and we will take you on a tour.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 23, 2009)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64 Update #21

FPB64-Nov13-09-127

We’ve got an interesting batch of photos to share with you this week. We’ll start again in the engine room, this time with the salt water feed system.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 13, 2009)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64 Update #20

FPB64-Nov-3-09--128

Here is a photo to start your heart racing! A double set of tool drawers under the work bench. This feature has been on our wish list for years, but for various reasons we have never been able to make it work. Aside from the space these drawers consume, access to a variety of systems has to be maintained.Tool drawers are a standard feature on the FPB 64.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (November 4, 2009)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 Update #19

FPB-64-prog-19-OCT-23-09--100

Welcome to progress report #19.We’ll start with a sure sign that we are in the 21st century. The opening photo shows the start of the NMEA 2000 “backbone” which we are installing in the FPB64s.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 23, 2009)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 Update # 18

FPB-64-Oct-8-2009-23

You are looking at what will eventually become the mast assembly on the FPB 64.This is a complex engineering job, with many tradeoffs and conflicts. As such this has taken a substantial amount of Circa’s and our time. Like many yacht details, there is more cost involved in the design than the actual fabrication.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 9, 2009)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64 Update 17

FPB64-Update-17-213

The sun is headed south towards New Zealand, and although spring is a little wet right now, soon it will be summer in the Southern Hemisphere. Progress continues on the first four FPB64s, hulls one and two of which are shown above in the fit out bay (one is on the left with its windows in place). From here on out as the interior goes in the photos will show a degree of visual chaos which will continue right up to the day before launching.

Now to some details.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (October 1, 2009)    |    Comments (5)

FPB 64 Update # 16

FPB-64-Update-16-1

We’ve got lots of photos to share in this update so make yourself comfortable. We’ll start with FPB 64 #2 making a brief journey from the metalwork shop to the fitting out area.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (August 26, 2009)    |    Comments (20)

FPB 64 Update #15

inverters

This update we have some catching up to do with photos.

The inverter system provides both 115VAC and 230VAC (on boats with just 230VAC the fourth inverter serves light loads like electronics and small galley appliances). Splitting the sources like this provides back up and reduces idling current when the stack of three inverters are not required for heavy loads.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 28, 2009)    |    Comments (7)

FPB 64 Update #14

DSC 4972

Things are moving swiftly in New Zealand on the FPB 64s. Hull number one is being ground now, and the plumbing and systems are just about ready for furniture installation to begin.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 24, 2009)    |    Comments (1)

FPB 64 Update 13

FPB-64-6-30-09-100

We love looking at the progress photos, especially the engine room (which is really hard to photograph). It is getting closed to being wrapped up and there is less confusion and more order now. This shot is taken from the engine room door, looking aft towards the port corner.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (July 1, 2009)    |    Comments (6)

FPB 64 Furniture – Final Finish Coming Together

FPB-64-June-29-09-112

Furniture for the first of the FPB 64s is now being completed and we thought you might like to see the level of finish quality. New Zealand is known for its wood workers, “Chippies” as they are called, and you can see why (although it is tough to really get a feel for finish without viewing it in person).

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 29, 2009)    |    Comments (2)

FPB 64 Update #12

fridge-compressor-2

Most motor yachts these days use household fridges and freezers. This has substantial cost advantages, but brings with it enormous power consumption. We have stayed with our highly efficient specially insulated box design, and these 24 volt DC Danfoss compressors connected to evaporator plates. There are three independent systems, each capable of being used as fridge or freezer. The combination of this hardware and our box design has proven to be the most efficient system we have ever used.

The compressors are cooled in the same fresh water tank that is used for the air conditioning system (discussed in the previous post). This is accomplished with a passive “keel coolers” mounted through the top of this cooling tank. We first tested this approach on Beowulf 14 years ago and it works so well that the compressors receive sufficient cooling even when the boat is hauled out for storage.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (June 26, 2009)    |    Comments (1)

FPB 64 Update #10 Part Two

FPB-64-May-20-09-305

Let’s switch to the engine room; looking aft here from the vantage of the starboard forward corner. The as yet uninsulated engine exhaust is to the left and the work bench to the right.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (May 26, 2009)    |    Comments (4)

FPB 64 Update # 9

fpb64 9 -12

Lots more to share this week, starting with the hydraulic system pulsation dampener (the pipe shaped device mounted on top of the hydraulic pump). We use these to reduce hydraulic noise.

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Posted by Steve Dashew  (May 7, 2009)    |    Comments (2)